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Tech Field Day 5 Is Over. Now What?

February 14, 2011 4 comments

I made it back to Nashville before noon on Saturday. A cross country red eye flight with a short layover in Atlanta put me into Nashville just in time. I was able to get a few hours with my kids, dinner with my wife and a bunch of friends from church, followed by dessert and more socializing with all those church friends over at my house. Sunday was full with church, time spent with my father explaining what this San Jose trip was all about(he was very interested in it all), a cub scout hike with my son, and more church. I’m still exhausted. I feel like I haven’t slept in days. I’ve had a nagging cough that air travel made worse and the weather is now 50 degrees warmer than when I left last week to go to California. My co-worker left my company to go work for a well known hardware vendor. His last day was Friday when I was in San Jose. As luck would have it, we had a major data center outage Friday afternoon. I spent the remaining hours in San Jose on the phone and glued to my laptop staring at switch configs. I didn’t get to really say proper goodbyes or even enjoy the final meal with everyone else as I was constantly jumping off and on a conference bridge to deal with the problems in the data center back home. In the end, the problem ended up being something outside of my control, so it was an extra kick in the teeth from the data center gods. In spite of it all, I feel like a million bucks!

Let me tell you why.

1. I love technology. – I love it to the core of my being. There is no greater joy for me than to immerse myself in the 1’s and 0’s of networking and consume mass quantities of information. I’ve never been one to understand people who do what I do for a living and have no real interest in technology outside of 8 to 5 Monday-Friday. Maybe that sounds somewhat elitist. Maybe that’s not a realistic attitude to have. I get paid to learn. That’s the coolest thing in the world. I guess I just recognize that opportunity for what it is and want to be around people who think the same way.

I have been a part of IT groups before where a core group of us had similar attitudes regarding the world of technology. We would feed off of each other and our efficiency and skillsets advanced much faster than all the other environments I have been in where not a whole lot of people shared the same drive and desires. Things change and our careers take us other places. Over time you start to shift back to what is normal for everyone else. You no longer look at Friday afternoon as an inconvenience since you have to put the toys away and go home for 2 days. You no longer wake up Monday morning excited to go into work. For a couple of days last week, I got that spark back.

Now, I don’t want you to think I have a depressing life. I LOVE my life. I love what I do for a living. I love just about everything about my life, and I work in a cubicle! My point, is that I was in the midst of a large group of technology zealots once again. Over the next couple of days, I would either witness or take part in countless discussions regarding networking, storage, virtualization, backups, or systems in general. These were discussions with people who were well versed in their respective areas. People who actually thought about technology as opposed to parroting talking points gleaned from a vendor slide deck. Some of them were published authors. I have a book collecting addiction. Being around authors rates pretty high on my scale of coolness.

2. I love talking to vendors. – My typical exposure to vendors is via their sales channel or third party reseller/integrator. This time, I was able to go straight to the source. I liked the fact that the companies I was exposed to at Tech Field Day 5 ranged from the very large like Symantec and HP, to the very small like Drobo, and Druva. I also saw the companies that fit in between those 2 groups like Xangati, Infoblox, and NetEx. I like talking to the vendors because they all want to differentiate themselves from one another. This means that in general, they have differing points of view as to how to solve a problem. By understanding each vendor’s approach, you can make a more informed decision.

I live on the corporate side of IT. If I make a recommendation in regards to the network, I need to make sure I make the BEST one possible. Yes it takes a lot of time and effort, but choices around hardware and software need to be treated with more care than one uses when selecting which brand of breakfast cereal to buy at the grocery store. I’ll talk to just about any vendor that lives within the network space. No matter how insignificant the product or company may seem, I want to know what it is they do. There is no such thing as being too prepared when it comes to making decisions about your network.

That was Tech Field Day in a nutshell for me. Lots of discussions with my peers and lots of discussions with vendors.  For now, I am still trying to digest it all. Two full days worth of briefings and discussions will take a bit to sink in for me. If anything, I have a sincere desire to shore up my virtualization and storage knowledge. I just have to find the time to fit it in. Networking on its own is enough to keep me busy for years to come!

I met some really great and SMART people at this event. Several of them I already knew from Twitter, and some of them I had read their blogs prior to this event. Others were affiliated with vendors, so I had never heard of them, except for some of the people from the larger companies. My RSS feed list has grown by quite a few entries as a result of this trip.

If I could give any advice in regards to this kind of event, it would be this. Go register to be a Gestalt IT Tech Field Day delegate. Do it NOW. If you love technology, if you love talking about technology, and if you want to mix it up with vendors in their own back yard, this is the event for you. I was taken care of very well by Claire and Steven. Nothing was overlooked. Every single vendor that presented seemed interested in us being there. Nothing was off limits in terms of what you could ask. Of course, there’s no guarantee they are going to answer it. The vendors still have to protect their intellectual property and rightfully so. Never in a million years would I have imagined that I would be able to engage someone like the CEO of Symantec and ask a direct question and get a direct answer. I also wouldn’t have imagined myself ever talking to the CEO and CTO of a company like Druva. I spent at least 15 minutes talking with them about their company, social media, and other similar things at the Computer History Museum. Without a doubt it was one of the high points of my trip to San Jose. I could go on and on about other incidents, but it wasn’t my intention to ramble on in this post.

Oh, and lest I forget to tie into the title of this post I should answer the question: “Now what?” Well, I still have to finish preparing to take the CCIE Route/Switch lab. However, I find myself wanting to give equal time to ramping up in the VMware and storage networking worlds. I spent several days in the midst of some storage and virtualization experts. What can I say? They have made me a convert. Or maybe it’s just that I want to understand a bit more of what they were talking about if I ever run into them again. 🙂 In the near future, I want to write a bit about the various vendors. In particular, I will focus on Xangati, HP, Infoblox, and NetEx. They have more of a network-ish focus and that’s the area I focus on. That’s not to say that I won’t comment on the others. I really enjoyed the data deduplication talk from Symantec!

I cannot say thank you enough to everyone who made this event possible. Stephen Foskett played the role of our fearless leader very well. Claire was the driving force behind the scenes making sure everything went off without a hitch. The audio/visual crew produced some very high quality stuff even in the face of several technological glitches. The vendors were very gracious in hosting all of us. I appreciate their interaction from the presentation standpoint as well as their active Twitter presence. Bonus points to Xangati for the bacon and chocolate espresso beans! As for the delegates, well I am humbled to have been among you. Some of you are used to interfacing with these companies at this level. I personally, am not. I do look forward to reading your writings and hope to run into you again at some point!

*****Disclaimer*****
As a Tech Field Day delegate for Gestalt IT, my flights, hotel room, food, and transportation were provided by all of the vendors that presented during this event. This was not provided in exchange for any type of publicity on my part. I am not required to write about any of the presentations or vendors. I received a few “souveniers” from the vendors which were limited to t-shirts, water bottles, pens, flash drives, notepads, and bottle openers.

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Wrapping My Head Around The Nexus1000v – Part 1

February 11, 2011 5 comments

****Note – I am NOT in any way shape or form a VMware expert. I can’t guarantee you that I will be 100% correct in my terminology or representation of VMware, VMotion, VSphere, etc. I apologize in advance. I am just a network guy trying to understand how the Nexus 1000V ties into the VMware ecosystem. I also understand that companies other than VMware are doing virtualization. Please feel free to correct my inaccuracies via the comments.

Paradigm shifts are coming. Some of them are already here. About 5 or 6 years ago I was first introduced to server virtualization in the form of VMware ESX server. For you old mainframe people, you probably weren’t as impressed as I was when I learned about this particular technology.

When it came to VMware, I wasn’t doing anything fancy. I was just using it to host a few Windows servers. When these boxes were physical, they were only using a fraction of their CPU, memory, and disk space. In most cases, they were specific applications that vendors would only support if they were on their own server. From a networking standpoint, there was absolutely nothing fancy that I was doing. All of the traffic from the virtual machines came out of a shared 1 gig port. For me, VMware was a fantastic product in that it allowed me to reduce power, rack space, and cooling requirements.

I realize that some people will take issue with my use of the term “server virtualization”. To some, software and hardware virtualization are different animals. For the purposes of non-VMware people like myself, the fact that I used VMware to reduce the physical server sprawl means that I refer to it as “server virtualization”.

Fast forward to today. It is getting harder and harder to find a company that isn’t doing some sort of server virtualization. It isn’t just about reducing physical server footprint and maximizing CPU and memory resources. These days, you can achieve phenomenal uptime rates due to things like VMotion. For those who are unfamiliar with VMotion, it is a service within VMware that can move a virtual machine from one physical host(ie ESX/ESXi server) to another. This can happen as a result of hardware failure on the physical host itself, additional CPU/memory resource requirements, or other reasons that the VMware administrator deems important.

Today, from a networking standpoint, there are 3 options when it comes to networking inside the VMware vSphere 4 ecosystem:

vNetwork Standard Switch – 1 or more of these standard switches reside on a single ESX host. This would be the vSwitch in older versions of ESX. This is basically a no frills switch. Think of this as managing switches without the use of VTP. You have to touch a lot of these switches if certain VLAN’s reside on multiple ESX hosts.

vNetwork Distributed Switch – 1 or more of these will reside in a “Datacenter”. By “Datacenter”, I am not referring to a physical location. Rather, in VMware lingo, it is a logical grouping of ESX clusters(comprised of ESX hosts). This is the equivalent of running VTP across a network of Cisco switches. You can make changes and have them show up on each ESX host that is part of the “Datacenter”. This particular switch type has several advantages over the standard switch in terms of feature availability. It also allows you to move virtual hosts between multiple servers via vMotion and have the policies associated with that host

Cisco Nexus 1000V – Similar to the distributed switch, except it was built on NX-OS and you can manage it almost like you would any physical Cisco switch. It also has a few more features that the regular VMware distributed switch does not.

That’s the basic overview as I understand it. What I had been struggling with was the actual architecture behind it. How does it work? I can look at a physical switch like the 3750 or 6500 and get a fairly decent understanding of it. Not the level I would like to have, but I understand that vendors like Cisco don’t want to give away their “secret sauce” to everyone that comes along and asks for it.

As luck would have it, my company has purchased several instances of the Nexus 1000V and last week, I was able to spend a day with a Cisco corporate resource and one of the server/storage engineers my company employs. I didn’t realize how deficient I was in the world of VMware until I got into a room with these 2 guys and we started talking through how we would design and implement the Nexus 1000V. I kept asking them to explain things over and over. In the end, a fair amount of pictures on the white board caused the light bulb in my head to go active. I still have much reading to do, but for now I understand it a LOT more than I did. Now, let’s see if I can have it make sense to you. 🙂

The Nexus 1000V is basically comprised of 2 different parts. The VEM and the VSM. If we were to assign these 2 things to actual hardware pieces, the VEM(Virtual Ethernet Module) would be the equivalent of a line card in a switch like the Nexus 7000 or a Catalyst 6500. In essence, this is the data plane. The second piece is the VSM(Virtual Supervisor Module). This is the same as the supervisor module in the Nexus 7000 or Catalyst 6500. As you probably already guessed, this is the control plane piece.

Here’s where it gets a bit crazy. The VSM can support up to 64 VEM’s per 1000V. You can also have a second VSM that operates in standby mode until the active fails. In theory, you have a virtual chassis with 66 slots. In the Nexus 1000V CLI, you can actually type a “show module” and they will all show up. Each ESX host will show up as its own module. Will you ever have 64 VEM’s in a single VSM? Maybe. However, there are limitations around the Nexus 1000V that make that unlikely.

The VEM lives on each ESX server, but where does the VSM reside? It resides in its own guest VM. You actually create a separate virtual machine for the VSM when installing the Nexus 1000V. That guest VM resides on one of the ESX servers within the “datacenter” that the Nexus 1000V controls. You access that guest VM just like you would a physical switch in your network by using the CLI. Once the VSM is installed, the network resource can go in via SSH or Telnet and configure away.

That’s the basic components of the Nexus 1000V. There are other things that need to be mentioned such as how communication happens from the guest VM perspective to the rest of the network and vice versa. Additionally, we need to discuss the benefits of using the Nexus 1000V over the standard VMware distributed switch. There’s a lot more than just the management aspect of it. I will cover that in part 2. Additionally, I plan on doing a write up on the Nexus 1010 appliance. This allows you to REALLY move the control plane piece out of the VMware environment and put it on a box with a Cisco logo on it.