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It’s Game Day! Are YOU Ready?

It’s late August here in the United States. That means one thing for a lot of people. Football is starting. No offense rest of the world. Your football is my soccer, although I tend to side with you that my soccer should be called football. How often does one kick an American football? A LOT less than we touch the ball with our hands. I’m getting off on a “semantics” tangent though. It is the one sport that predominately resides within North America. Yes, I am acknowledging you too Canada!

Many athletes at all age levels have been practicing for several months and are ready to get started with the football season. Many a Saturday afternoon, Sunday afternoon, and Monday night will be spent watching people knock each other over to carry a piece of pig skin across some lines on the ground and celebrate by dancing as gracefully as one can when covered by all that protective gear. Millions of people will watch all the way up to early next year when the championships are decided by as little as 1 point. For the most part, there are no do-overs. All of you “instant replay” fans just bite your tongue and let me carry this analogy as far as I can. When the game is over, it is over. There are no series of games like baseball, hockey, and basketball have. You have one shot at glory. Miss it, and you’ll have to wait until next season.

There’s a German proverb which says: “To aim is not enough. You must hit!”

I get paid for things that go bump in the night. Whether that thing happens to be a router failing, or a circuit deciding it no longer likes my 1’s and 0’s, my job is to fix it and fix it fast.

I do come to work during the day. I go to meetings and look at configurations of various hardware. I build network diagrams and dispense or seek advice on a number of different things. I participate in the important philosophical discussions like whether or not Anakin Skywalker was a better Jedi than Luke or Yoda(In my opinion, Anakin (aka Darth Vader) was the better Jedi and was robbed of his destiny by his meddling child and his rebel scum friends). I put in change requests for maintenance that must be performed. I can plow through the day to day stuff without hardly any interaction from management. Of course, they care about the quality of the work and if I used these stencils in my Visio diagrams, they might object. However, my overall existence in the day to day network operations life is rather calm.

In essence, I do the things that need to be done during the day, but my REAL job comes in spurts. Kind of like football(From now on, when I say football, I mean American football.) players. My game time comes at odd hours much like the police officer or fire fighter. When trouble happens, I need to perform. I need to be able to ask the right questions and formulate a short list of what the possible problems are. I need to be able to troubleshoot in a logical fashion either working up/down the OSI model or grabbing a packet capture and examining the session flows. When it is my equipment or systems that are at fault, I have to get in there and make the big play. I need a touchdown each and every time. I can’t drop a pass or fumble the ball. I get paid for results and rest assured my management is watching. They have to. All it takes is for someone much higher up on the food chain to ask why they pay the salaries of network people who can’t seem to fix the network. Then, I am out on the street forced to sell my services to the highest bidder, who hopefully doesn’t play Dungeons and Dragons or World of Warcraft with any of my now former co-workers/managers. I would have used a sport like tennis or basketball, but since I am in IT, the odds of that happening are much less than a bunch of technical geeks sitting around in Viking helmets and leather tunics taking part in the raid of an Ogre village on World of Warcraft over a shared broadband connection in an obscure apartment complex deep in suburbia while guzzling Red Bulls and listening to angry death metal music. By the way, for all of you D&D geeks who are shaking your heads in disgust at my mention of Ogre villages, I get it. I saw Shrek. I know they are solitary creatures, but I needed an effective illustration. If I used Elf village, the visual would have been less powerful.

Am I saying that we can’t make mistakes? Well, that depends. There are some places in which you can’t. Ever. Most places will allow mistakes. We’re all human and mistakes will happen. Of course, with enough attention to detail those mistakes can be minimized significantly. What I AM saying is that you need to be able to perform when a crisis hits. Your entire career at a particular company may come to a screeching halt over just a few minutes of doing the wrong thing. It won’t matter how long you have been with company X if your performance is so poor that company X starts bleeding millions of dollars due to an outage that you can’t fix. Problems are going to happen. Outages are going to happen. If your company expects you to fix them, you better fix them. Now I know that some people get in over their heads. It may be the company’s fault for placing an unrealistic demand on you, or it may be your fault for misrepresenting your capabilities. If your company is expecting you to fix and support issues with F5 load balancers and you have never so much as looked at an F5 load balancer, you better let someone know and get up to speed as fast as you can. After all, your job typically is whatever your company says it is. Don’t like that? Tough. Go somewhere else. Life isn’t fair. Sometimes you are the one in the room everyone is counting on to fix the problem, even if it isn’t your equipment that is causing the problem.

In the interest of brevity, let me close with some thoughts on how to ensure your performance is top notch.

1. Know what the scope of your job is. – This may seem a bit simplistic, but you need to be on the same page as management when it comes to your responsibilities. You cannot rely on someone else to tell you if that piece of network gear buried in some rack in a data center is your responsibility. You are going to have to find that out yourself and it needs to happen before the problem occurs. Hopefully your co-workers who have been there longer than you have a good grasp on what things belong to you. For example, if your boss expects you to take care of the wireless network, you better do it or have it handed off to someone else who can take care of it when a problem arises.

2. Develop your skills around your responsibilities. – I’m not advocating you abandon any sort of professional development that is not DIRECTLY related to your job. However, a BIG part of getting a pay check from a company is directly tied to being able to do your job as defined by the company. Good managers won’t load you up with things you are not able to do unless you have managed to con your way into a job by being a bit liberal with your resume. If you are stuck with something you are relatively new to, do the best you can and make sure your management KNOWS you are doing the best you can. Read books, configuration guides, white papers, and other technical documentation. Attend a training class. A career in IT is all about adaptation. None of us are working with the same hardware/software we were 10 years ago. If you are, odds are you either work for the government or a REALLY cheap company. Perhaps there are one or two things that have had a ten year plus shelf life, but for the most part, technology changes so fast that a decade is a lifetime in IT.

3. Be prepared. – Expect the unexpected. Think about different failure scenarios and design the network to remediate any single points of failure. If need be, have some block time purchased with an external consultant or VAR that has considerable experience with your specific hardware/software platforms. Carry maintenance contracts on all your hardware/software that is critical.

4. Raise any red flags early on. – If there are issues you know are going to be a problem, let someone know as soon as possible. Document those issues. Fix those issues. Even if the company says no due to budgetary reasons or some technical issue, at least you have done your homework and tried to make these issues known. If a problem does occur, nobody can come back to you and say that you should have known about this, or that it was your fault, etc. Additionally, it may work out to your benefit as management typically appreciates people who just want to make things better and do what is right for the stability of the network.

5. Stay calm during the outage/problem. – Remember that in a lot of people’s eyes, it is always the network that is at fault. Don’t let that get you down. Stay focused and work on the problem at hand. Ask as many questions as needed to get an idea of what the scope of the problem is. Don’t be afraid to ask very basic questions. One of the best ones to ask is “What changed?” or “When did the problem start?”. Maintain professionalism at all times. I get upset when I am on a conference call and someone won’t stop moaning about why it’s not their fault long enough for me to ask a question or answer one. However, it’s rather immature and unprofessional for me to lash out at them in anger even if I know it’s not my issue. There ARE times when I have had to tell someone to stop talking so that I could either answer a question or ask one of someone else on the call. I hate having to do that, but sometimes in the interest of getting it fixed YOU HAVE TO. If you are dealing with an issue where people are congregating around your desk watching over your shoulder, try and tune them out. You can’t always tell them to get lost or to leave you alone. You have to learn to work under pressure, but if you have taken item number 2 to heart, you should be able to minimize the time these people are hovering near your desk.

6. Be humble. – If people know that you don’t know it all, they tend to cut you a little more slack. If you are condescending and treat people like garbage because they don’t know the difference between a “routed” protocol and a “routing” protocol, they will be very unforgiving of your mistakes. Remember, there is no way possible you can know it all. There are people out there who know far more than you do. Sometimes they are in the same room as you. If you save the day and score a touchdown, good job. You don’t have to do the happy dance in front of everyone if you figure out what caused that routing loop. Your actions will speak for themselves. On the other hand, if you storm into the room demanding people shut up and watch you perform, you better get it right. If you don’t, your stock just went down and at some point, you’ll be looking for work elsewhere.

Ask any athlete how hard they have to work in order to get to their peak performance level and you’ll no doubt hear a recurring answer. You will find that it took a lot of time and effort to get there. There are no short cuts. When the wide receiver catches the ball and runs 80 yards to the end zone for a touch down, you can bet he ran sprints hundreds of times in the months prior. When the quarterback throws the ball for 50 yards and drops it right on the chest of the wide receiver, you can bet he threw that same pass hundreds of times in the months prior. When the defensive end wraps his arms around the running back and slams him to the ground, you can bet he practiced on a tackling dummy hundreds of times in the months prior. The examples go on and on. Peak performance takes time and effort. You practice and refine your skills for what is usually a short performance. Sometimes the performance extends over a couple of days or weeks, but generally issues get diagnosed and resolved in a relatively short time. How you prepare will determine the outcome. If you take shortcuts, expect poor results. If you put in the effort to perform well, good things will come your way. Granted, you probably won’t get a multi-million dollar contract with company X, but how many football players do you know who understand cool stuff like policy routing and VRF’s? Oh, and being able to fix problems on the network quickly leaves you more time to play World of Warcraft.

Categories: efficiency, learning

Don’t Just Collect. Consume.

August 19, 2010 14 comments

I have a bit of a problem when it comes to information. I tend to resemble someone on the TV show Hoarders. I have loads of PDF files on my laptop. Some are on my iPad. Some are on my desktop PC. I even have some on a little flash drive I carry around in my pocket. Of course, I have plenty of books. Just for networking related stuff, I have a pile at home as well as a good size collection at work. Then there are the URL’s. Every day I save all of the valuable URL’s I have discovered from Twitter and RSS feeds and put them in their own little folder with the date as the name under my bookmarks in Firefox. If I follow you on Twitter and you post a link, odds are I have looked at it and bookmarked it if it is something that pertains to my interests. If I read your blog, and odds are I do, I will bookmark various posts of yours and at some point go back and reference them. You see, I don’t always have time to read everything during the day. Additionally, if it is a post like this, or this, I will have to go back and read it all when I have a considerable amount of free time.

Therein lies the problem. I never seem to have time to go back and sift through every thing like I had planned. Well, that’s not entirely true. I have the time. I just get caught up in all the new links that are posted on Twitter every day and wind up spending study time skimming new blog posts or digging through websites. There’s a lot of good info out there that people are sharing. I suppose I could limit my intake to just routing and switching, but what fun would that be? Besides, I don’t want to be ignorant of the other things that are out there. After all, it wasn’t that long ago that I had absolutely nothing to do with voice, storage, wireless, and security. Times are changing, and changing fast.

There’s just so much out there that needs to be absorbed. Just when I think I have a handle on most of the Cisco product line, they go and release UCS, and the Nexus 1000V, and the ASR1000’s, and Clean Air. It never ends. There is always a new technology or some new hardware to read up on.

The realization I have come to is that there is no use in collecting information if you are not going to use it. All of those PDF’s, books, and URLs will do me no good if I never use them. At the same time, if I stop keeping up with what is current, I will fall behind and be of less help to my employer. I won’t be able to effectively design anything because I won’t be aware of what the possibilities are.

One of two things has to happen. The first option is that I can really narrow down the focus to just the things that directly pertain to my job. That will alleviate some of the information I have been hoarding. The second option is to start dedicating a bigger portion of my day to information consumption. I think option two is the best one as I can’t see myself ignoring products and technologies that I am not using today due to the fact that I may be using them tomorrow. Besides, it’s more fun when you have a wide range of technologies to keep up with as opposed to a handful.

I don’t know how everyone else handles their technical knowledge maintenance. If you happen to have a tried and true method of keeping up with all things networking, I would love to hear about it.

Categories: efficiency, learning, vendors

You’re lying. Well, at least until we see the packet capture.

August 10, 2010 4 comments

Maybe you’ve experienced this before. You are minding your own business without a care in the world when all of the sudden the phone rings.

You: Hello?
Them: There’s a problem and we think the network is the cause. Can you check it?
You: Check what? The network?
Them: Yes.
You: Which part? What am I looking for?
Them: Any sort of problem.
(Fast forward an hour or so later)
You: Well, I ran a packet capture on the switch port connecting to system XYZ. I see a bunch of TCP resets coming from your server.
Them: Okay. We’ll take a look.
(Fast forward another half hour or so)
Them: It looks like we found the problem. Process blah-blah-blah was failing due to a dependency on process ha-ha-ha. We reset the services and everything is working again. Thanks for your help.
You: Okay. Not a problem.
(Back to life as before)

Sound familiar? If you have been in networking for more than a couple of years, this should invoke all kinds of warm and fuzzy memories. Meals were missed. Plans were canceled. Sleep was lost. All in the name of defending the network’s honor. Oh yes. This is the part about a career in networking that is conveniently left out of the brochure you are given before signing your life over to Cisco/Juniper/Citrix/Aruba/Nortel/F5/Brocade/Alcatel/etc.

I have seen more than my fair share of these incidents. With the exception of a brief stint in consulting and about 2 years doing things in the US military that you’ll never do anywhere else, I have lived my entire IT existence in the “corporate” setting. By that I mean chained to a desk looking over logs and configurations. Slaving away on the same network for years on end. Getting to know the lay of the land in the same way one knows all the sounds an old car or house makes. In short, after you work on a certain network long enough, you can see into the guts of it like Neo can with the Matrix.

If you are like me, you have a certain affinity towards your network. Sure, it may need some help with cabling or a cleaner route table, but you work with what you have. You make changes as you can. You replace hardware as the budget allows. You care for it like a farmer does his corn fields. Is this creeping you out yet? Well it shouldn’t. There are plenty of people out there who love their networks even to the point of showing them off to the world.

Here’s the problem with being a networking engineer/administrator/architect/designer/janitor. You have to understand everyone else’s piece of the pie, but not too many people have to understand yours. Fair? No, it isn’t, but as an officer I once worked for in the military told me: “That’s a burden you have to bear.” He was right, even if I didn’t like hearing it. That is not to say that all other entities within IT or greater corporate America are completely clueless when it comes to networks. Quite the contrary. There are plenty of systems people who understand networks very well. You can give them an IP with a classless subnet mask and they don’t even bat an eye because they know exactly what you mean when you say it’s a slash 26 network. However, when it comes to “applications” people, my experience has been that they only have to know their piece of the pie and can conveniently blame the network when a problem arises. I know what you’re thinking. Did he just paint all applications people with a broad brush? Yes. Yes I did. Of course, if you happen to be an applications person, I meant everyone else. Not you. 😉

That brings me to the title of this mini-rant/post. You can plead your case before everyone telling them that it probably isn’t the network, but they’re not going to believe you. Why? A lack of understanding or a lack of visibility into your world. You see, the network is just a big murky box to them. Maybe if they had access to some monitoring platforms they could be swayed, but unless your monitoring package can go down to the transaction level like Compuware’s Vantage product, you’re still going to have some explaining to do. However, in a way that I cannot begin to explain, people tend to believe packet captures. Don’t ask me why. I can tell you until I am blue in the face that the switches and routers on the network for the most part could care less what your payload is and you won’t believe me. You may not even understand TCP, UDP, and the rest of the acronym soup being tossed around, but for some reason, Wireshark or tcpdump results are more credible than Steven Hawking discussing time travel. If you want some good laughs around things like this, follow this guy on Twitter. He seems to deal with this on a regular basis and has some hilarious tweets to show for it.

Let me end this post with the following suggestions:

1. Get familiar with interpreting packet captures. Wireshark is the most well known packet capture utility for Windows boxes out there. There’s even a good book out there that covers everything in detail. You’ll also need to know about TCP and how it works. There are other protocols like UDP and ICMP that will be good to know, but TCP is by far the most useful protocol to know and understand when dealing with packet captures. For some good info on TCP, see here.

2. Don’t be afraid to run a packet capture early on in the troubleshooting process. I am finding that this tends to solve the problem when all other methods fail.

3. Don’t EVER, and I stress EVER, state emphatically that there is no way possible that the network is at fault. 99 times out of 100 you may be right. Get it wrong 1 time, and everyone will be gunning for you. There’s always the possibility that the network is at fault. Even when everything you know is telling you that it isn’t the network, if you don’t have a packet capture to back it up, you’re wasting your time.

4. Educate your co-workers about the network, or networking in general. Try to do this without condescension. Nobody wants to listen to Nick Burns tell them how stupid they are. The more people know, the less likely they are to hurl unsubstantiated accusations your way that you are manipulating traffic to break their application. It makes every organization a lot stronger when education is provided from the various departments. Please understand that although you and I might get excited when talking about routing protocols, not everyone else will. Oh how I wish my wife and I could have the EIGRP vs OSPF discussion, but it’s just not going to happen. Some people are not going to want to know a whole lot about the network, so try and figure out how much they really want to know and tailor the education to that level.

If nothing else, looking at a bunch of packet captures will help you appreciate what is going on behind the scenes every time you read an e-mail message or look at a website. Although other people might not appreciate it, I find that it helps my wife fall asleep faster when I talk about the various TCP flags and why they are used in data transmissions. At least she will never blame the network. 🙂

Categories: efficiency, learning Tags:

How much do you REALLY know about technology X?

July 29, 2010 6 comments

Think about something you know a fair amount about. It can be anything in the realm of networking. Now imagine yourself explaining it to someone. Not just anyone. Someone who has a decent grasp on it, but maybe not all of the particulars. Can you explain it to them on the fly without stammering and stuttering your way through it?

I am a Twitter addict. I use it primarily for IT related stuff. There are plenty of valuable links and comments that show up on a given day. Amazing things. Things I never thought about. Comments that come from people who’s books I have read. Comments that come from 4 and 5 time CCIE’s. Comments that come from people who’s podcasts I listen to every week driving to and from work. In short, it is almost as if you know them on some weird Internet non-stalker type level.

Today I saw and even somewhat participated in a discussion about EIGRP. That got me thinking. I like EIGRP. I think it’s neat as far as routing protocols go. It doesn’t have the whole “standards” thing going for it like OSPF or IS-IS. It doesn’t run the Internet like BGP. There aren’t very many books written about it. The CLI options are a lot smaller when compared to OSPF and BGP. The list goes on and on. The more I thought about it, the more I realized I don’t have the complete understanding of it that I wish I did.

Replace EIGRP with about 20 or 30 other networking technologies/protocols and I can make the same argument. I may know all the little acronyms or terms that go along with that technology or protocol, but can I break it down and explain it to someone who sort of understands it and just needs the finer points? Isn’t that what separates the really good engineers from the average ones?

Back to EIGRP though. I understand metric calculation. I understand K values. I understand several other things about EIGRP that go beyond the CCNP level and possibly approaching, maybe even exceeding, CCIE level. I am not bragging. I’ve just put in the hours from an “academic” standpoint, which translates to reading a lot of books, design guides, whitepapers, etc about EIGRP. However, I find myself struggling to come up with all of the arguments for why EIGRP is a hybrid routing protocol compared to a distance vector protocol and vice versa. There are people out there who swear it is one or the other. That should be a relatively simple thing to discern. It makes me think I really don’t understand EIGRP as well as I think I do. Granted, you can NEVER know it all about anything in the IT field, but we still have to try. We read questions on forums from people just starting out with something like EIGRP and think: “How could you not know that? Everyone knows that K1 is bandwidth and K3 is delay.” Maybe we pass by a CCNA book at the bookstore and chuckle at how trivial the description is of EIGRP. “What? You don’t even mention stub routers or how to avoid SIA conditions?” Admit it. You do it. If you don’t, then you are truly the example of a good engineer.

What to do about this? Well, I should study more. I should study and lab so much that when a CCIE walks up to me and says: “How does EIGRP do this?”, I can answer them in a fair amount of detail and even break out the whiteboard and draw it out. Or, crank out a config in a few minutes. Imagine if you knew the protocol or technology so well that you could just spew forth tons of factual information about it? Imagine if you could sit down with a blank piece of paper and fill it up on both sides with information about something like DWDM, 802.11n, PPP, or HSRP. What would that be like? Not just know from an academic standpoint, but be able to apply it to real world scenarios. There is tremendous value in that.

Just something to think about. Imagine having to teach cooking to Emeril. Or martial arts to Chuck Norris. Or basketball to Michael Jordan. Would you want to know your stuff? You betcha. Think about the things you deal with in the networking world and apply the same philosophy to it.

When I begin to understand something well enough to teach it to people that understand it as well and not have them laugh me out of the room, I will be at the level I want to be at. Impossible to do with all things network related, but definitely achievable to do with a dozen or so things. Perhaps the hardest part of it is dedicating the time to achieve that level of proficiency.

I’m going to revisit EIGRP over the next couple of weeks and try to increase my level of understanding even more. Then, I will read someone’s blog post or Twitter comment and realize how little I actually know and go back and do it all over again. Frustrating? Sure, but I will take that any day over a job where you can learn it all in a couple of months. Happy learning!

Categories: learning, routing, switching

A World of Resources……

July 26, 2010 2 comments

You’ll never learn it all. The more you learn, the more that holds true. However, that shouldn’t keep you from trying to learn it all. In light of that, you have to realize that some of the best resources don’t show up in a Google search. While I use Google several times a day, it is only a single tool in my trusty old geek toolbox. With that in mind, here’s some general resources along with a few route/switch ones. Possibly even a non-R/S resource or two.

1. Twitter – I was fairly skeptical about Twitter before I started using it. At first I just lurked. Now, I tend to be a bit more sociable with others on Twitter. I cannot emphasize how valuable this tool has been. Oh, and use something like Tweetdeck as opposed to the regular Twitter.com website. Need some good accounts to follow? You can start by mining my list of users that I follow. Well over 90% of them are people/companies that are focused on the networking industry.

2. RSS Feeds – Remember the days when you had to visit all 20 of your favorite websites every day? I do. Those days are gone thanks to the wonderful world of RSS feeds. I follow at least 75-100 blogs/sites and am able to get updates on them within minutes by simply pulling the latest posts/links from their RSS feeds. There are a ton of different readers out there. I have used Great News for the past 4 years or so.

Here’s a few blogs to get you started. Half of the fun of this process is finding which blogs/sites you like and everyone is different.

These are the links to the blogs themselves. The link to the RSS feeds for each site should be relatively easy to locate on the sites themselves.

Etherealmind
Packetlife
Internetwork Expert
IPExpert
IOS Hints
Aaron’s Worthless Words

There are many, many more, but the ones I listed above are some of the more frequently updated ones.

2 other good sources of blogs that you can follow via RSS can be found at Cisco’s site and Network World’s site.

3. Podcasts – I have a 45 hour commute to and from work, so I have over an hour a day that I can listen to something other than music if I want to. Having said that, there is a definite lack of good quality networking podcasts. However, there are a few that I listen to quite regularly. They are: Packet Pushers, Wireless LAN Weekly, and Cisco TAC Security Podcast. Another way to find networking podcasts is to go on iTunes and just search for Cisco or Juniper under the audio podcast directory. You will find plenty of abandoned ones(mainly from Cisco), but there are still some pretty decent podcasts out there even if they haven’t released a new episode in the last year or two.

4. Videos – I am a visual learner, so I really appreciate good quality video. You can always go to YouTube and search for something specific. Many times you can find something good, but you typically have to sort through a whole bunch of unrelated/boring stuff to find the 1 or 2 videos that are beneficial. Here are the sites I like to go to for some pretty decent content:

Cisco TechWiseTV
NANOG (North American Network Operators Group)
Cisco Live Virtual – Yes, you can pay $400 to get all the sessions, but there are quite a few that are free.

5. Talk to people – Yes. I know. People suck. We all get into the IT field because we would rather converse with a machine than a human. We do this for 2 reasons. First, computers just make sense. Second, we want to have a leg up on everyone else when Skynet goes active and the machines take over. However, people CAN help you. Quite a few of them will actually go out of their way to help you. Not everyone in IT is a jerk. Odd perhaps, but not all jerks. The best thing I ever did was get involved with the local Cisco user’s group. We meet one night a month and have a technical presentation, followed by some free book giveaways. Dinner is always provided by a vendor or some other company. Free food, free books, free technical info, etc. What’s not to love? You also get to network with your peers and talk about your networks and the problems/solutions that go along with them. If you don’t know of one in your local area, check here. Your career will thank you.

6. Books – There is no way around it. You have to read. If you want to become a CCNA/CCNP/CCIE/CWNE/JNCIE/CISSP/etc you will have to do some reading. Sometimes the books are a thousand pages. Sometimes they are only 900. 🙂 If you want to rise above mediocrity and really dig in to the technologies, you have to read. For the rest of your career. I prefer physical books. Some people like e-books. Pick the format that works best for you. The benefit to the electronic format is that you can pack an entire library on your Kindle, Nook, iPad, or laptop and always have it available. I am a big fan of the Cisco Press books, but I caution you to use a variety of sources/publishers like O’Reilly, Wiley, etc. Cisco Press does not always mean 100% accurate. Plus, there are some really cool books outside of the Cisco Press world. For example, I read a book on T-1’s from O’Reilly. A complete book on T-1’s! It was awesome. I initially had plans of seeing streams of 1’s and 0’s and being able to break down the ESF format by sight alone and reassemble it by hand. After reading the book, I was closer to that goal, but due to constant ridicule from co-workers, I had to let that dream go. If you want, you can pick up that dream and run with it. You will have my utmost respect and admiration, which translates to me following you on Twitter.

I know I have missed other things I should have included. Perhaps when I remember them I will add them to this list. Perhaps the most important thing when trying to find resources to aid you in your education/certification is to think outside of the box. Or, think outside of the search engine. There are many, many resources that are not going to show up in search results. Do you use a particular company’s services or products? Go look at their website. They might have a fair amount of media and whitepapers available. Case in point. I happen to use some Riverbed appliances at work. Riverbed has some pretty decent videos describing their technology on their website. I had to poke around the site for awhile, but finally found the videos in their marketing/news portion of their website. I have found the same to be true for other vendors. XO has a pretty decent knowledge section with whitepapers and presentations surrounding their service offerings and service provider technology in general. The list goes on and on.

Whatever you do, don’t stop learning. Whether you are going for a certification or just wanting to learn in general, don’t ever quit. The more you know, the easier your job gets. The more you teach others, the easier your job gets. I always tell people that I have 2 jobs. The first one is for the company I work for. The second job is making myself stronger from a technical standpoint. Job 1 is dependent on job 2. I am not saying don’t have a life outside of work. What I am saying is that you have to put in some extra time outside of work if you ever want to do great things in the world of networking. If you don’t you will end up like this guy. Don’t be that guy!

Categories: learning